Sexual Orientation and the Social Constructionist Controversy

Sexual Orientation and the Social Constructionist Controversy

There is nothing mixed up about a woman who loves women, who wants to have sex with them, or who identifies as a lesbian. It is society that is mixed up because it punishes people for not conforming to its gender stereotypes.

~ Edward Stein, editor of Forms of Desire: Sexual Orientation and the Social Constructionist Controversy

Image

Positive Trends in LGBT Rights

Positive Trends in LGBT Rights

Despite the persistent restrictions on LGBT rights in some regions and states and the further tightening of controls in others, experts are quick to highlight more heartening trends elsewhere.
“We see positive developments going on in other parts of the world, in particular related to marriage equality,” said Dittrich. “There are more and more countries in the world that open up their civil legislature, their marriage legislature for couples of the same gender. Today, 10 percent of the world’s population is living in countries where same-sex marriage has been legalized.” Just this year, new additions to this group included France, Great Britain, Uruguay, and New Zealand, with similar legislation being discussed in several others.
The United Nations has entered the fray of LGBT rights with renewed energy in recent years, under the leadership of secretary-general Ban Ki-Moon, who is a staunch supporter of equality and nondiscrimination. “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights,” he said in a December 2012 speech in which he pledged to work toward decriminalizing homosexual conduct worldwide. “All human beings—not some, not most, but all.”

Image

Watch the moment gay couple tie the knot in Birmingham for the first time

Image

Nearly 30 years after first meeting, Stephen Trinder and David Hensonnow have the same rights as every other married couple in Britain and like most newlyweds, a honeymoon is on the cards

Meet Mr and Mr Trinder, They made history today by becoming the first gay couple to wed in Birmingham when same-sex marriage became legal in Britain.

Stephen Trinder, 60, from Handsworth, and partner David Henson, 53, from Leamington, have been together for 26 years and after grabbing the earliest possible slot, they left Birmingham register office shortly after 10am a married couple.

Nearly 30 years after first meeting, they now have the same rights as every other married couple in Britain and like most newlyweds, a honeymoon is on the cards.

They chose a subtle ceremony, followed by a small reception and a sunset cruise along the city’s canals and plan to head to Portugal next week.

Stephen said: “It feels absolutely fabulous to be married. I’m so proud to be a Brummie and to make history in my home city that I love so much.

“My great-great-grandfather got married in a register office all that time ago and now I have been able to get married under a new law.

“Birmingham’s motto is ‘forward’ and it’s always strived to achieve that.

He added: “I love Birmingham and on a more personal note, I love David. Now we can be ourselves in front of the world every day.”

David, a housing officer, said he feels ‘privileged’ to be part of such a momentous day.

He said: “I chose to take Stephen’s surname because for me, it was important that we have the same name so we can be a family.”

The couple added: “Many congratulations to everyone else who has gotten married today. And thank you for all the campaigning – and look at the good it has achieved.”

The Marriage (Same Sex Couples) Act faced opposition from the Church of England, the Catholic Church, The Muslim Council of Great Britain, the Network of Sikh Organisations and the United Synagogue.

This week, the Archbishop of Canterbury signalled that the Church of England would end its opposition to same-sex marriage.

 

Source: http://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/midlands-news/gay-wedding-birmingham-watch-moment-6893006

Watch the moment gay couple tie the knot in Birmingham for the first time